Queuing Protocol

It’s surprising the number of people who do not understand queuing protocol. This is the relatively standard technique for waiting at a commercial establishment to order or purchase something.
For example, waiting in a line at a famous fast food restaraunt you would expect the majority of people would stand behind others who were waiting before they arrived. Imagine my surprise when a supermom in a mini-van arrives and decides that the current line formation is insufficient for her requirements. In this case, it was going to be easier if she could stand to my immediate left with her gaggle and occupy a large percentage of my peripheral vision. In fact at various intervals it became clear that my position in line was in jeopardy.
In fact, her attempt at line process reengineering was almost successful. Customers arriving subsequent to supermom had some confusion in terms of where the line should begin. In most cases they ended up immediately behind me, which ultimately served to obfuscate the precense of supermom in the line.
Then there was the retired couple at a local pharmacy who decided that it would be faster to approach the cash register if they stepped on my feet. Granted, this particular line was executed in parallel with the checkout counter, but that’s no excuse for encroaching onto your neighbors feet.
The ultimate line breach had to be when an amorous couple at a local ice cream stand decided they would abort their order. They were immediately in front of me when they resolved to abruptly leave the line. Rather than start waiting at the end, or even leave the ice cream stand altogether, they decide to hold each other at the front of this line. What am I suppose to do at this point?
Maybe a few sessions with a therapist on commitment would be good for them. The older couple need to learn that they have as much time as everyone else, and supermom is lacking her organizational skills altogether.
It seems evident that lines are a reflection of our conformity, but they also describe our ability to manage pressure when confronted with circumstances beyond our control.